Type

Journal Article

Authors

Simon John More
Elizabeth Lane
Guy McGrath
Tracy A Clegg
Damien J. Barrett
Jamie A Tratalos

Subjects

Veterinary

Topics
large scale ireland freedom from disease bluetongue surveillance animal health serology

Sampling Methodology to Maximize the Efficient Use of National Abattoir Surveillance: Using Archived Sera to Substantiate Freedom From Bluetongue Virus Infection in Ireland (2018)

Abstract In recent years, there has been increasing recognition of the value of multiple data sources available to fulfill surveillance objectives, and the use of these has been applied to address many questions relating to animal health surveillance. In Ireland, we face a slightly different problem, namely, best use of an existing surveillance resource (serological samples collected over many years from cull cows at slaughter), which has been used to substantiate freedom from Brucella abortus following its successful eradication in 2009. In this study, we evaluate a sampling methodology to use this resource to substantiate freedom from bluetongue virus (BTV) infection. An examination of the degree to which cull cows were resident in the same herd throughout the midge biting season showed that, of 50,640 samples collected between 17 October and 23 December 2016, 80.2% were from animals resident in the same herd between 01 April 2016 and 2 months prior to their slaughter date, 74.1% for 1 month prior, 70.1% for 2 weeks prior, 66.4% for 1 week prior, and 56.4% up to 1 day prior to slaughter. An examination was made of the degree to which individual samples within the same 88-well frozen storage block came from geographically clustered herds, whether from a concentration of animals from the same herd in a single block, or from clustering around the slaughterhouse where the samples were taken. On the basis of these analyses, a sampling strategy was derived aimed at minimizing the number of storage blocks which needed to be thawed, whilst ensuring a large enough and representative sample, geographically stratified according to the bovine population of 51 squares, each 45 × 45 km, covering the entirety of Ireland. None of the 503 samples tested were positive for BTV, providing reassurance of national BTV freedom. More broadly, the study demonstrates the use of abattoir-based serological samples collected for one large scale surveillance programme in surveillance for other bovine infections.
Collections Ireland -> University College Dublin -> Veterinary Medicine Research Collection
Ireland -> University College Dublin -> School of Veterinary Medicine
Ireland -> University College Dublin -> College of Health and Agricultural Sciences

Full list of authors on original publication

Simon John More, Elizabeth Lane, Guy McGrath, Tracy A Clegg, Damien J. Barrett, Jamie A Tratalos

Experts in our system

1
S J More
University College Dublin
Total Publications: 213
 
2
Guy McGrath
University College Dublin
Total Publications: 52
 
3
Tracy A Clegg
University College Dublin
Total Publications: 55
 
4
Damien J. Barrett
Teagasc
Total Publications: 23
 
5
Jamie A Tratalos
University College Dublin
Total Publications: 16