Type

Journal Article

Authors

Giles D Warrington
Alan M Nevill
Thomas M Comyns
Mark Lyons
Caoimhe Tiernan

Subjects

Physiotherapy & Sport

Topics
rugby union monitoring markers on feet training load optimizing performance team sports training status recovery low cost

The relationship between adductor squeeze strength, subjective markers of recovery and training load in elite rugby players (2019)

Abstract The adductor squeeze strength test has become a popular training monitoring marker, particularly in team sports. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between adductor squeeze strength scores, subjective markers of recovery and training load in elite Rugby Union players, because of limited research in this area. Nineteen elite male Rugby Union players completed daily monitoring markers (adductor squeeze strength and 5 selected subjective markers of recovery), over a 10-week preseason training period. Rate of perceived exertion (RPE) was collected to determine training load (session RPE; RPE x session duration) and to calculate weekly training load. Spearman’s correlation was used to analyze the relationship between adductor squeeze strength scores, subjective markers of recovery, and weekly training load. The results found that where adductor squeeze scores decreased, both perceived fatigue levels (r=-0.335; R² = 11.2%; p < 0.001) and muscle soreness (r=-0.277; R² 5 7.7%; p < 0.001) increased. A weak correlation was found between Monday adductor squeeze strength scores and the previous week’s training load (r=-0.235; R²= 5.5%; p < 0.001) and Friday adductor squeeze strength scores and the same week’s training load (r=-0.211; R² = 4.5%; p < 0.05). These results show that adductor squeeze strength may provide coaches with a time-efficient, low‐cost objective, player monitoring marker. Additionally, the combination of adductor strength squeeze, with subjective markers, perceived fatigue, and muscle soreness, and appropriately planned training load may help coaches to optimize training adaptations by determining a player’s training status.
Collections Ireland -> University of Limerick -> Research Institutes
Ireland -> University of Limerick -> Faculty of Education & Health Sciences
Ireland -> University of Limerick -> Departments Education & Health Sciences
Ireland -> University of Limerick -> Health Research Institute (HRI)
Ireland -> University of Limerick -> Research Institutes, Centres and Units
Ireland -> University of Limerick -> Physical Education and Sports Science

Full list of authors on original publication

Giles D Warrington, Alan M Nevill, Thomas M Comyns, Mark Lyons, Caoimhe Tiernan

Experts in our system

1
Giles Warrington
University of Limerick
Total Publications: 54
 
2
Alan M Nevill
University of Limerick
Total Publications: 18
 
3
Thomas M Comyns
University of Limerick
Total Publications: 36
 
4
Mark Lyons
University of Limerick
Total Publications: 42
 
5
Caoimhe Tiernan
University of Limerick
Total Publications: 3