Type

Journal Article

Authors

David A. Kenny
Michael G. Keane
Padraig O'Kiely
B. Cummins

Subjects

Agriculture & Food Science

Topics
grass silage sugar beet beet pulp single layer silage conservation characteristics lactic acid silage effluent formic acid

Conservation characteristics of grass and dry sugar beet pulp co-ensiled after different degrees of mixing (2007)

Abstract The objective of this experiment was to quantify the effects of the degree of mixing of dry molassed sugar beet pulp (BP) with grass on silage conservation characteristics.Herbage from a timothy (Phleum pratense) sward was precision chopped and treated with a formic acid based additive (3 l/t grass). Units of 50 kg grass, without or with 2.5kg BP were randomly allocated among four replicates on each of seven treatments. The treatments were (1) no BP (NONE), (2) BP evenly mixed through the grass (EVEN),(3) BP evenly mixed through the lower 25 kg grass (LOWH), (4) BP evenly mixed through the lower 12.5 kg grass (LOWQ), (5) 0.625 kg BP mixed through the top 25 kg grass and 1.875 kg SBP mixed through the lower 25 kg grass (25/75), (6) BP placed in 0.5 kg layers beneath each 10 kg grass (LAYR), and (7) BP placed in a single layer under all of the grass (BOTM). Laboratory silos were filled and sealed, and stored at 15 °C for 163 days. Effluent was collected and weighed from each silo throughout the ensilage period.At opening, silage composition and aerobic stability measurements were made. Total outflow of effluent was reduced (P<0.001) by the addition of BP; LAYR had a greater effect (P<0.001) than any of the other treatments. Effluent dry matter (DM) concentration was highest (P<0.05) for BOTM and lowest (P<0.01) for NONE. All treatments underwent similar lactic-acid dominant fermentations. Incorporation of BP with grass increased silage DM concentration (P<0.001), in vitro DM digestibility (P<0.05) and water soluble carbohydrate (P<0.001) concentration and reduced acid detergent fibre (P<0.001) concentration. Aerobic stability was similar across treatments and aerobic deterioration at 192 h was higher (P<0.05) for LOWQ, 25/75, LAYR and BOTM than for NONE. In conclusion, the incorporation of BP increased silage DM digestibility but had relatively little effect on fermentation or aerobic stability. Placing BP in layers gave the largest and most sustained restriction in effluent output.
Collections Ireland -> Teagasc -> Grassland Science
Ireland -> Teagasc -> Animal & Grassland Research & Innovation Programme
Ireland -> Teagasc -> Irish Journal of Agricultural & Food Research
Ireland -> Teagasc -> IJAFR volume 46, 2007

Full list of authors on original publication

David A. Kenny, Michael G. Keane, Padraig O'Kiely, B. Cummins

Experts in our system

1
D.A. Kenny
Teagasc
Total Publications: 147
 
2
Michael G. Keane
Teagasc
Total Publications: 50
 
3
Padraig O'Kiely
Teagasc
Total Publications: 71