Type

Journal Article

Authors

David J Mooney
Garry P Duffy
Conor J Walsh
Fergal J O'Brien
Nikolay V Vasilyev
Yevgeny Brudno
Dmitry E Shvartsman
Sarah A Lewin
Conn L Hastings
Ellen T Roche

Subjects

Biochemistry

Topics
therapy humans vehicles hexuronic acids cytology female chemistry drug effects myocardial infarction collagen alginate acute tissue engineering cells immobilized blood cell survival beta glycerophosphoric acid stem cells glucuronic acid heart alginates biocompatible materials alginic acid animals delivery retention rats mesenchymal stromal cells hydrogels human mesenchymal stem cells mesenchymal stem cell transplantation chitosan rats sprague dawley cells cultured glycerophosphates

Comparison of biomaterial delivery vehicles for improving acute retention of stem cells in the infarcted heart. (2014)

Abstract Cell delivery to the infarcted heart has emerged as a promising therapy, but is limited by very low acute retention and engraftment of cells. The objective of this study was to compare a panel of biomaterials to evaluate if acute retention can be improved with a biomaterial carrier. Cells were quantified post-implantation in a rat myocardial infarct model in five groups (n = 7-8); saline injection (current clinical standard), two injectable hydrogels (alginate, chitosan/β-glycerophosphate (chitosan/ß-GP)) and two epicardial patches (alginate, collagen). Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were delivered to the infarct border zone with each biomaterial. At 24 h, retained cells were quantified by fluorescence. All biomaterials produced superior fluorescence to saline control, with approximately 8- and 14-fold increases with alginate and chitosan/β-GP injectables, and 47 and 59-fold increases achieved with collagen and alginate patches, respectively. Immunohistochemical analysis qualitatively confirmed these findings. All four biomaterials retained 50-60% of cells that were present immediately following transplantation, compared to 10% for the saline control. In conclusion, all four biomaterials were demonstrated to more efficiently deliver and retain cells when compared to a saline control. Biomaterial-based delivery approaches show promise for future development of efficient in vivo delivery techniques.
Collections Ireland -> Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland -> PubMed
Ireland -> Trinity College Dublin -> Administrative Staff Authors (Scholarly Publications)
Ireland -> Trinity College Dublin -> Administrative Staff Authors

Full list of authors on original publication

David J Mooney, Garry P Duffy, Conor J Walsh, Fergal J O'Brien, Nikolay V Vasilyev, Yevgeny Brudno, Dmitry E Shvartsman, Sarah A Lewin, Conn L Hastings, Ellen T Roche

Experts in our system

1
David J Mooney
Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland
Total Publications: 7
 
2
Garry P Duffy
Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland
Total Publications: 54
 
3
Conor J Walsh
Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland
 
4
Fergal J O'Brien
Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland
Total Publications: 265
 
5
Conn L Hastings
Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland
Total Publications: 11
 
6
Ellen T Roche
Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland
Total Publications: 4