Type

Journal Article

Authors

Ian H Robertson
Redmond G O'Connell
Jessica Bramham
Marco Castorina
Jacqueline M Shanahan
Grainne R Fleming
Simona Salomone

Subjects

Psychiatry

Topics
adverse effects large scale everyday life self efficacy randomized controlled trial attention deficit hyperactivity disorder adhd self training neuropsychological tests

The effects of a Self-Alert Training (SAT) program in adults with ADHD. (2014)

Abstract Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), a neuropsychiatric condition characterized by attention and impulsivity problems, is one of the most common behavioral disorders. The first line of treatment for ADHD is psychostimulant medication, but this has limited effectiveness, particularly in adults, and is often associated with adverse side-effects. Thus, it is imperative that new non-pharmaceutical approaches to treatment are developed. This study aims to evaluate the impact of a non-pharmacological Self-Alert Training (SAT) intervention on ADHD symptom prevalence, psychological and cognitive functioning, and on everyday functional impairment in adults with ADHD. Fifty-one adult participants with a current diagnosis of ADHD were randomized to either SAT or a Control Training (CT) program. They were assessed at baseline, immediately following the 5-week training period, and after 3-months using ADHD symptoms scales, as well as a series of neuropsychological tests and psychological questionnaires. Subjective ratings of everyday life attention and memory problems were also collected. The SAT group showed significant improvements in ADHD inattentive and impulsive symptoms, depressive symptoms and in self-efficacy ratings compared to the CT group at both post-training and at the 3-month assessment. Pre-post improvements in SAT participants on untrained cognitive tasks measuring selective attention and executive functions were also observed. Finally, the SAT group reported improved subjective ratings of everyday life attention at both assessment points. This pattern of results suggests that SAT may be beneficial in treating ADHD symptoms as well as psychological and cognitive impairments in adult ADHD. A large-scale randomized controlled trial (RCT) is needed.
Collections Ireland -> Trinity College Dublin -> PubMed

Full list of authors on original publication

Ian H Robertson, Redmond G O'Connell, Jessica Bramham, Marco Castorina, Jacqueline M Shanahan, Grainne R Fleming, Simona Salomone

Experts in our system

1
Ian H Robertson
Trinity College Dublin
Total Publications: 142
 
2
Redmond G O'Connell
Trinity College Dublin
Total Publications: 49
 
3
Jessica Bramham
University College Dublin
Total Publications: 19
 
4
Marco Castorina
Trinity College Dublin
Total Publications: 6
 
5
Simona Salomone
Trinity College Dublin
Total Publications: 5