Type

Journal Article

Authors

Ian H Robertson
Michael Gill
Ziarih Hawi
Mark A. Bellgrove

Subjects

Psychiatry

Topics
attention humans physiology child adolescent genetics behavioral female genetics genetic predisposition to disease enzymology dopamine beta hydroxylase attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity male polymorphism genetic case control studies

The cognitive genetics of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): sustained attention as a candidate phenotype. (2006)

Abstract Here we describe the application of cognitive genetics to the study of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Cognitive genetics owes much to the pioneering work of cognitive neuropsychologists such as John Marshall, whose careful observations of cognitive dissociations between brain-lesioned patients greatly advanced the theoretical understanding of normal cognitive function. These theories have in turn helped to constrain linkages between candidate genes and cognitive processes and thus help to drive the relatively new field of cognitive genetics in a hypothesis-driven fashion. We examined the relationship between sustained attention deficits in ADHD and genetic variation in a catecholamine-related gene, dopamine beta hydroxylase (DbetaH). DBH encodes the enzyme that converts dopamine to noradrenaline and is crucial to catecholamine regulation. A polymorphism with the DBH gene has been associated with ADHD. In fifty-two children with ADHD, we examined whether variation in the Taq I DBH gene polymorphism was related to sustained attention performance. Participants performed the Sustained Attention to Response Test (SART). Performance on the SART discriminates ADHD from control children, and in imaging work, is associated with right frontoparietal activation. A significant effect of DBH genotype was found on SART performance measures. Children possessing two copies of the ADHD-associated risk allele (A2) had significantly poorer sustained attention than those ADHD children who did not possess this allele or a non-genotyped control group. The DBH gene may contribute to the susceptibility for ADHD, in part because of its varying effects on the development of brain mechanisms mediating sustained attention.
Collections Ireland -> Trinity College Dublin -> PubMed

Full list of authors on original publication

Ian H Robertson, Michael Gill, Ziarih Hawi, Mark A. Bellgrove

Experts in our system

1
Ian H Robertson
Trinity College Dublin
Total Publications: 142
 
2
Michael Gill
Trinity College Dublin
Total Publications: 260
 
3
Ziarih Hawi
Trinity College Dublin
Total Publications: 28
 
4
Mark A. Bellgrove
Trinity College Dublin
Total Publications: 35