Type

Journal Article

Authors

Colin Hill
R Paul Ross
Paul D. Cotter
Des Field

Subjects

Chemistry

Topics
bioengineering nisin lantibiotic this review physicochemical properties antimicrobial peptides post translational modifications recent developments

Bioengineering of the model lantibiotic nisin. (2015)

Abstract The lantibiotics are a class of bacterially produced antimicrobial peptides (bacteriocins) that contain several unusual amino acids resulting from enzyme-mediated post-translational modifications. They exhibit high specific activity against Gram-positive targets, including many antibiotic-resistant pathogens, and consequently have been investigated with a view to their application as antimicrobials in both the food and medical arenas. Importantly, the gene-encoded nature of lantibiotics makes them more amenable to bioengineering strategies to further enhance their antimicrobial and physicochemical properties. However, although the bioengineering of lantibiotics has been underway for over 2 decades, significant progress has only been reported in recent years. This review charts recent developments with regard to the implementation of bioengineering strategies to enhance the functional characteristics of the prototypical and most studied lantibiotic nisin.
Collections Ireland -> University College Cork -> PubMed

Full list of authors on original publication

Colin Hill, R Paul Ross, Paul D. Cotter, Des Field

Experts in our system

1
Colin Hill
University College Cork
Total Publications: 351
 
2
R Paul Ross
Teagasc
Total Publications: 441
 
3
Paul D. Cotter
Teagasc
Total Publications: 253
 
4
Des Field
Teagasc
Total Publications: 30