Type

Conference Proceedings

Authors

Kate Irving (lupton)
Alan F. Smeaton
Eamonn Newman
Louise Hopper

Subjects

Computer Science

Topics
psychology dementia medical ethics multi sensor system third party consent information technology early stage dementia assistive computer technology

Dementia ambient care: ethical issues arising from the use of a home-based multi-sensor support system (2015)

Abstract Background: With the worldwide increase in dementia prevalence acceptable cost-effective home-based solutions are needed to support people with dementia (PwD) living in the community and to delay institutionalisation. Ambient assistive technologies represent a way of enabling independence and facilitating “ageing in place”, by supporting the health, lifestyle, and safety of PwD in an unobtrusive manner. However, ethical issues associated with their use remain under-reported. Methods: Dem@Care is an FP7 project that uses ambient and wearable sensors to support physical activity, sleep, activities of daily living, social interaction, and mood in PwD. It uses a multiple case study design with purposive sampling of people with early stage dementia. An individualised sensor “toolbox” and intervention strategy is developed for participants based on a clinical assessment of their needs. Sensor data is aggregated over time to identify changes in patterns of behaviour that could signify improvement, stasis, or deterioration of function. Results: Our first two case studies raised important ethical issues associated with sensor use. Difficulties using the technologies resulted in heightened anxiety for the PwD and their carer. Sensor ‘privacy’ buttons were often forgotten resulting in image capture that might not have been intended and was potentially embarrassing to the PwD, and ambient video recording could not be deployed given the lack of an acceptable solution to obtaining third party consent. Conclusions: Although potentially beneficial to PwD, the ethical issues associated with the use of ambient assistive technologies require further discussion given the vulnerability of this population.
Collections Ireland -> Dublin City University -> Publication Type = Conference or Workshop Item
Ireland -> Dublin City University -> Subject = Medical Sciences: Medical ethics
Ireland -> Dublin City University -> Status = Published
Ireland -> Dublin City University -> Subject = Business: Assistive computer technology
Ireland -> Dublin City University -> DCU Faculties and Centres = DCU Faculties and Schools: Faculty of Science and Health: School of Nursing and Human Sciences
Ireland -> Dublin City University -> Subject = Medical Sciences: Psychology
Ireland -> Dublin City University -> Subject = Computer Science: Information technology
Ireland -> Dublin City University -> DCU Faculties and Centres = Research Initiatives and Centres: INSIGHT Centre for Data Analytics

Full list of authors on original publication

Kate Irving (lupton), Alan F. Smeaton, Eamonn Newman, Louise Hopper

Experts in our system

1
Alan F. Smeaton
Dublin City University
Total Publications: 492
 
2
Eamonn Newman
Dublin City University
Total Publications: 28
 
3
Louise Hopper
Dublin City University
Total Publications: 34