Type

Journal Article

Authors

Daniel Kelly
Tariq Mesallati
Tatiana Vinardell
Eamon J Sheehy

Subjects

Biochemistry

Topics
mesenchymal stromal cells mice cytology engineering mesenchymal stem cells chitosan next generation medical devices mechanical engineering chemistry bone tissue engineering metabolism alginate hydrogel tissue engineering bone regeneration fibrin mice inbred balb c swine cartilage articular endochondral ossification bone marrow osteogenesis chondrogenesis mice nude mesenchymal stem cell hydrogels animals bone cartilage regeneration

Engineering cartilage or endochondral bone: A comparison of different naturally derived hydrogels. (2014)

Abstract Cartilaginous tissues engineered using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown to generate bone in vivo by executing an endochondral programme. This may hinder the use of MSCs for articular cartilage regeneration, but opens the possibility of using engineered cartilaginous tissues for large bone defect repair. Hydrogels may be an attractive tool in the scaling-up of such tissue engineered grafts for endochondral bone regeneration. In this study, we compared the capacity of different naturally derived hydrogels (alginate, chitosan and fibrin) to support chondrogenesis and hypertrophy of MSCs in vitro and endochondral ossification in vivo. In vitro, alginate and chitosan constructs accumulated the highest levels of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG), with chitosan constructs synthesizing the highest levels of collagen. Alginate and fibrin constructs supported the greatest degree of calcium accumulation, though only fibrin constructs calcified homogeneously. In vivo, chitosan constructs facilitated neither vascularization nor endochondral ossification, and also retained the greatest amount of sGAG, suggesting it to be a more suitable material for the engineering of articular cartilage. Both alginate and fibrin constructs facilitated vascularization and endochondral bone formation as well as the development of a bone marrow environment. Alginate constructs accumulated significantly more mineral and supported greater bone formation in central regions of the engineered tissue. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the capacity of chitosan hydrogels to promote and better maintain a chondrogenic phenotype in MSCs and highlights the potential of utilizing alginate hydrogels for MSC-based endochondral bone tissue engineering applications.
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Full list of authors on original publication

Daniel Kelly, Tariq Mesallati, Tatiana Vinardell, Eamon J Sheehy

Experts in our system

1
Daniel Kelly
Trinity College Dublin
Total Publications: 190
 
2
Tariq Mesallati
Trinity College Dublin
Total Publications: 7
 
3
Tatiana Vinardell
Trinity College Dublin
Total Publications: 27
 
4
Eamon J Sheehy
Trinity College Dublin
Total Publications: 8