Type

Journal Article

Authors

Hilary Humpreys
Richard W Costello
Breda Cushen
Imran Sulaiman
Elaine MacHale
Martha McElligott
Mary Corcoran
Mandy Jackson
Hannah McCarthy

Subjects

Medicine & Nursing

Topics
clinical research prospective cohort study streptococcus pneumoniae royal college follow up chronic obstructive pulmonary disease copd autumn and observational study

Colonisation of Irish patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by Streptococcus pneumoniae and analysis of the pneumococcal vaccine coverage: a non-interventional, observational, prospective cohort study. (2017)

Abstract To characterise the pattern of colonisation and serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who currently receive the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV-23) according to vaccination status, use of antibiotics and steroids. To investigate the prevalence of PPV-23 and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-13) serotypes within the study cohort. A non-interventional, observational, prospective cohort study with a 12‚ÄČ-month follow-up period inclusive of quarterly study visits. Beaumont Hospital and The Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland Clinical Research Centre, Dublin, Ireland. Patients with an established diagnosis of COPD attending a tertiary medical centre. Colonisation rate of S. pneumoniae in patients with COPD and characterisation of serotypes of S. pneumoniae with correlation to currently available pneumococcal vaccines. Sputum and oropharyngeal swab samples were collected for the isolation of S. pneumoniae. Seasonality of colonisation of S. pneumoniae and its relationship with the incidence of exacerbations of COPD. S. pneumoniae was detected in 16 of 417 samples, a colonisation incident rate of 3.8% and in 11 of 133 (8%) patients at least once during the study. The majority of S. pneumoniae isolates were identified in spring and were non-vaccine serotypes for either the PPV-23 or PCV-13 (63%). The colonisation incident rate of S. pneumoniae fluctuated over the four seasons with a peak of 6.6% in spring and the lowest rate of 2.2% occurring during winter. Antibiotic use was highest during periods of low colonisation. There is seasonal variation in S. pneumoniae colonisation among patients with COPD which may reflect antibiotic use in autumn and winter. The predominance of non-vaccine types suggests that PCV-13 may have limited impact among patients with COPD in Ireland who currently receive PPV-23. NCT02535546; post-results.
Collections Ireland -> Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland -> PubMed

Full list of authors on original publication

Hilary Humpreys, Richard W Costello, Breda Cushen, Imran Sulaiman, Elaine MacHale, Martha McElligott, Mary Corcoran, Mandy Jackson, Hannah McCarthy

Experts in our system

1
Richard W Costello
Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland
Total Publications: 66
 
2
Breda Cushen
Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland
Total Publications: 13
 
3
Imran Sulaiman
Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland
Total Publications: 24
 
4
Elaine MacHale
Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland
Total Publications: 19
 
5
Martha McElligott
Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland
Total Publications: 3
 
6
Hannah McCarthy
Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland
Total Publications: 11