Type

Journal Article

Authors

Aideen McKevitt
Laura Kirwan
Breige McNulty
Megan O'Donoghue
Sophie Millar

Subjects

Sociology

Topics
rural and urban irish post primary schools post primary schools water observation irish adolescents ireland consumption

A cross-sectional observation on habitual non-alcoholic beverage consumption among adolescents from four Irish post-primary schools. (2016)

Abstract No up-to-date data on the dietary intake of Irish adolescents are available. The aim of the present pilot study was to obtain and compare cross-sectional information on habitual adolescent beverage consumption between four distinct post-primary schools in the Republic of Ireland, in 2014-2015. A cross-sectional observation study. A beverage consumption questionnaire was used to obtain data on beverage intake and influences on consumption. Four post-primary mixed-sex schools in Ireland representing the following school classifications were selected for the study: urban fee-paying, urban disadvantaged, rural fee-paying and rural disadvantaged. Students (n 761) aged 12-18 years. Data were analysed by Kruskal-Wallis (non-parametric) ANOVA to compare the distribution of beverage consumption across the schools. Water was the most highly consumed beverage among students from all four schools (median 1425 ml/d). Students from urban and rural disadvantaged schools reported a significantly higher volume of carbonated beverage intake than students from fee-paying schools. Students from an urban disadvantaged school also reported a significantly higher volume of carbonated beverage and energy drink intake compared with the other three schools. Students from an urban fee-paying school reported the highest consumption of water, while rural disadvantaged school students were the biggest consumers of tea and milk. Significant differences in beverage consumption (ml/d) were reported by adolescents from four schools in Ireland. Surveillance on current beverage consumption trends among adolescents is vital to guide policies and interventions, and for appropriate targeting of resources.
Collections Ireland -> University College Dublin -> PubMed

Full list of authors on original publication

Aideen McKevitt, Laura Kirwan, Breige McNulty, Megan O'Donoghue, Sophie Millar

Experts in our system

1
Breige A McNulty
University College Cork